Category: Art

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LOUISE BRIGHAM: Adventures of a Scrap Artist

By Antoinette LaFarge

“Two summers on the island of Spitzbergen,” wrote Louise Brigham in 1909, “taught me, more than all previous experiments, the latent possibilities of a box.” The book she published that year, Box Furniture, is indeed a testament to the possibilities of a box—and not just any box, but specifically the packing crates then used to ship all kinds of ordinary consumer goods. Brigham found in those humble, cheaply made boxes inspiration for a unique system of furniture design based entirely on recycled packing crates.

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Contemplating Disembodiment in the work of Liat Yossifor

By Susan Power

Our experience of time and space has been radically disrupted by the threat of the pandemic; its scope and sobering impact both intimate and distant. Yet this existential crisis can promote a new way of being in the world. With so many aspects of our lives on hold, the current moment offers a rare opportunity to reflect upon the “state of things.” Like the eponymous 1982 film by Wim Wenders, which revolves around a science fiction film cast and crew stranded together on location when the production is stalled due to sudden lack of funds, Liat Yossifor’s latest body of work was on its way to Sydney, Australia for a solo show at Fox Jensen Gallery scheduled to open on March 28 when it became stranded in shipping crates, postponed in the voyage to its destination, and ultimately consigned to a screen…

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Sajitha R. Shankhar: An Indian Artist’s Journey (Part I)

By Gail Levin

Sajitha R. Shankhar is the rare living woman artist from the South of India to have multiple works in the National Gallery of Modern Art of India. Yet there was no context for her ambition in her family or the traditional south Indian life. Journalists and critics have both praised the autobiographical strain in Sajitha’s art and argued that her work goes beyond her own story.

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Miklós Erdély, Time Traveler

By Éva Forgács

Hungarian artist Miklós Erdély (1928–1986) would not have thought twice about boarding a spaceship, sweeping aside physical fitness and other pedestrian worries. Space seemed to promise first-hand answers to urgent and intriguing questions… Thinking more like an artist than a scientist, Erdély was taken by the dilemma of black holes, which could signify the same kind of discontinuity in time and space that he thought artwork signified in culture.